a descriptive piece of writing

a descriptive piece of writing

The painting was a field of flowers, blues and yellows atop deep green stems that seemed to call the viewer in to play.
In descriptive writing, the author does not just tell the reader what was seen, felt, tested, smelled, or heard. Rather, the author describes something from their own experience and, through careful choice of words and phrasing, makes it seem real. Descriptive writing is vivid, colorful, and detailed.

A descriptive piece of writing
A good descriptive paragraph is like a window into another world. Through the use of careful examples or details, an author can conjure a scene that vividly describes a person, place, or thing. The best descriptive writing appeals to multiple senses at once—smell, sight, taste, touch, and hearing—and is found in both fiction and nonfiction.
by Barbara Carter

A descriptive piece of writing
Once a topic is chosen, students should spend time thinking about the qualities they want to describe. Brainstorm about all the details associated with the topic. Even when not writing about a place, reflect on the surroundings. Where is the object located? Where does the person live? Consider not just physical characteristics, but also what memories, feelings, and ideas the subject evokes. Memory and emotion play an important role in conveying the subject’s significance. Plan the focus of each paragraph and create an outline that puts these details into a logical sequence.
If you had to pick a study buddy, you would pick this guy.

A descriptive piece of writing
The RAFT strategy encourages descriptive writing by encouraging students to think through the writer’s Role, the Audience, the Format, and the Topic. The Writing Fix offers guidance for building a RAFT writing prompt that challenges students to think deeply about history.
3. Good descriptive writing uses precise language. General adjectives, nouns, and passive verbs do not have a place in good descriptive writing. Use specific adjectives and nouns and strong action verbs to give life to the picture you are painting in the reader’s mind.

A descriptive piece of writing
Read your entire essay over again, out loud this time. Sometimes reading something out loud can help to identify any issues that should be worked out. Read the essay again to a friend or family member and have them give you any criticisms that they might have. Have someone else ready your essay and then ask them if anything needs to be clarified or if they received a clear picture from the details given in the essay.
Next, create five labelled columns on a sheet of paper, each one having a different of the five senses. This labelled list will help you to sort out your thoughts as you describe your topic – the taste, sight, touch, smell and sound of your topic can be sketched out among the columns. List out in the columns any sensation or feeling that you associate with the topic that you are writing about. You need to provide full sensory details that help to support the thesis. You can utilize literary tools such as metaphors, similes, personification and descriptive adjectives.

References:

http://www.thoughtco.com/model-descriptive-paragraphs-1690573
http://www.time4writing.com/writing-resources/descriptive-essay/
http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/descriptive_writing
http://www.grammarcheck.net/how-to-write-a-descriptive-essay/
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/descriptive-text-examples.html