academic english writing

academic english writing

Some instructors, reviewers and style guides prefer that authors avoid using ‘I’ and ‘we’ in academic English writing, although others do not have a restriction on such a format. Before you begin writing, check with your instructor, preferred journal, etc., to determine if they have specified whether it is ok to use such language.
As you write, remember to eliminate unnecessary words and use clear, direct language. Although academic English writing should be formal, it does not have to be overly wordy or complex; writing that’s too complex will make it harder for your audience to determine your meaning, which then makes it harder for them to understand your arguments. Don’t go too far in the other direction, though, and make all your sentences short and too simple. Very short sentences can make your text sound choppy, which will distract your readers.

Academic english writing
How do you know what to edit when you’re writing your drafts? With the help of others, of course!
If you can’t find anyone who will read all 94 of your freshman year pages, you can give yourself feedback. Use a peer feedback guide like this one or this one to find areas of your writing that can be improved.

Academic english writing
Question: ‘Should parents educate their children at home?’ This is the full lesson from the images above. The essay can be used in a number of different ways – see the lesson plan. Words: 440 Level ** *** [C2/B1] / Webpage link.
Sometimes students wonder what is academic stance / voice and find it difficult to identify how it is used. This document provides a clear example of how a writer adds their own voice through language. Webpage link.

Academic english writing
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The Academic Phrasebank is a general resource for academic writers. It aims to provide you with examples of some of the phraseological ‘nuts and bolts’ of writing organised according to the main sections of a research paper or dissertation (see the top menu ). Other phrases are listed under the more general communicative functions of academic writing (see the menu on the left). The resource should be particularly useful for writers who need to report their research work.The phrases, and the headings under which they are listed, can be used simply to assist you in thinking about the content and organisation of your own writing, or the phrases can be incorporated into your writing where this is appropriate. In most cases, a certain amount of creativity and adaptation will be necessary when a phrase is used.The items in the Academic Phrasebank are mostly content neutral and generic in nature; in using them, therefore, you are not stealing other people’s ideas and this does not constitute plagiarism. For some of the entries, specific content words have been included for illustrative purposes, and these should be substituted when the phrases are used.The resource was designed primarily for academic and scientific writers who are non-native speakers of English. However, native speaker writers may still find much of the material helpful. In fact, recent data suggest that the majority of users are native speakers of English. More about Academic Phrasebank.

References:

http://www.fluentu.com/blog/english/writing-academic-english/
http://www.academic-englishuk.com/writing
http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/gothedistance/academicwriting
http://www.phrasebank.manchester.ac.uk/
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/writer