images to describe

images to describe

Watch the video of two students describing photos as part of a speaking exam. Then read the tips below.
In some speaking exams you have to talk about photos or pictures. The video and tips below will help you to do really well in this type of speaking exam.

Images to describe
In most cases adding a description as ” alt” text is all that is needed. But you can use text adjacent to the image or within the page containing the image to describe the image explicitly. In other words, sometimes text around the image may also describe the image. This may be redundant, but in keeping with best practice for use of images it is better to offer too much than too little information.
Here’s an example of an image that would be appropriate for use with a “D” link. This generally represents the exception.

Images to describe
Images that are purely decorative do not need to be described. For example, you may have noticed a light blue star image that appears at the end of modules within this course. That image is intended to be decorative (to offset what is an otherwise boring looking white page.) Thus, it does not need to be described in text.
When we think about what is essential, we need to consider the learning goal associated with an image. Whether the image is a chart, picture, or graphic, we tend to select images to further our students’ understanding of our material. In the image below, (showing an individual on a cell phone, separated from a tribe) we might draw attention to different aspects of the picture, depending on the instructional goal.

Images to describe
People differ in the way that they can (or like to) consume information, especially in educational contexts. Some people might prefer information provided in text, or video, or audio; and their accessibility needs can also influence their preferences.
The alternative text for the graph (supplied through its alt attribute, which you can add when you upload a graphic using a web editor) would be too long if it were to describe everything in the graph, so it just describes the graph’s purpose. And by placing this paragraph first, we make sure screen reader users can still get the information they need.

References:

http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/lbph/faq/image-description
http://www.sfcollege.edu/accessibility/electronic-accessibility/canvas/images
http://accessibility.huit.harvard.edu/describe-content-images
http://www.teachstarter.com/us/teaching-resource/dressing-sentence-activity-us/