writing a description

writing a description

The waves rolled along the shore in a graceful, gentle rhythm, as if dancing with the land.
The following sentences provide examples of the concreteness, evocativeness and plausibility of good descriptive writing.

Writing a description
Mitchell, D. (1996). Writing to learn across the curriculum and the English teacher. English Journal, 85, 93-97.
Miller, R.G., & Calfee, R.C. (2004). Making thinking visible: A method to encourage science writing in upper elementary grades. Science and Children, (42)3, 20-25.

Writing a description

“On one corner of my dresser sits a smiling toy clown on a tiny unicycle―a gift I received last Christmas from a close friend. The clown’s short yellow hair, made of yarn, covers its ears but is parted above the eyes. The blue eyes are outlined in black with thin, dark lashes flowing from the brows. It has cherry-red cheeks, nose, and lips, and its broad grin disappears into the wide, white ruffle around its neck. The clown wears a fluffy, two-tone nylon costume. The left side of the outfit is light blue, and the right side is red. The two colors merge in a dark line that runs down the center of the small outfit. Surrounding its ankles and disguising its long black shoes are big pink bows. The white spokes on the wheels of the unicycle gather in the center and expand to the black tire so that the wheel somewhat resembles the inner half of a grapefruit. The clown and unicycle together stand about a foot high. As a cherished gift from my good friend Tran, this colorful figure greets me with a smile every time I enter my room.”

In their own way, each of the following writers (three of them students, two of them professional authors) have selected a belonging or a place that holds special meaning to them. After identifying that subject in a clear topic sentence, they proceed to describe it in detail while explaining its personal significance.

Writing a description

John was hopeless at golf. The ball rarely ended up where he had intended to hit it, but he loved the good thwack of the driver sending it on its misguided way.

Used well, they beautify a passage in a novel. Used too often, they make it look gaudy.

Writing a description
That’s accurate, yes. It’s informative, yes. But it’s bland as heck.
I hope it’s obvious that that sentence hardly transports us anywhere. It’s too bland. Too unfocused. Too generic. There are literally thousands of villages in the world which would fit that description.

References:

http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/descriptive_writing
http://www.thoughtco.com/model-descriptive-paragraphs-1690573
http://www.novel-writing-help.com/descriptive-writing.html
http://jerichowriters.com/sense-of-place-novel/
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/descriptive-text-examples.html